Go to Kentucky.gov home page
KY National Guard History eMuseum

Kentucky Counties Named in Honor of Military Personnel

Of the 120 counties that comprise the Commonwealth of Kentucky, 72 counties have been named in honor of military personnel.

  1. Adair County 44th county, established in 1801, named in honor of General John Adair. 8th Governor of Kentucky.
  2. Allen County 57th county, established in 1815, named in honor of Colonel John Allen, hero of the War of 1812.
  3. Ballard County 93rd county, established in 1842, named in honor of Captain Bland Ballard, a participant in the Battle of Fallen Timbers (1793) and the River Raisin (1813).
  4. Boone County 30th county, established in 1798, named in honor of Colonel Daniel Boone.
  5. Butler County 53rd county, established in 1810, named in honor of General Richard Butler, a Revolutionary War soldier from Pennsylvania, who was killed by Indians at St. Clair's Defeat in 1791.
  6. Caldwell County 51st county, established in 1809, named in honor of General John Caldwell, who had served under General George Rogers Clark in the Indian wars.
  7. Calloway County 72nd county, established in 1822, named in honor of Colonel Richard Callaway, a Kentucky explorer and friend of Daniel Boone.
  8. Campbell County 19th county, established in 1794, named in honor of Colonel John Campbell, a Revolutionary War officer.
  9. Casey County 46th county, established in 1806, named in honor of Colonel William Casey, a Revolutionary War veteran.
  10. Christian County 21st county, established in 1796, named in honor of Colonel William Christian, of Virginia, and a veteran of the Revolutionary War.
  11. Clark County 14th county, established in 1792, named in honor of General George Rogers Clark, Revolutionary War hero.
  12. Clay County 47th county, established in 1807, named in honor of General Green Clay.
  13. Crittenden County 91st county, established in 1842, named in honor of John Jordan Crittenden, during the War of 1812 served as an aide to General Samuel Hopkins and then to General Isaac Shelby.
  14. Daviess County 58th county, established in 1815, named in honor of Colonel Joseph Hamilton Daviess of the Kentucky Militia, killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
  15. Edmonson County 79th county, established in 1825, named in honor of Captain John Edmonson of Virginia, who was killed at the Battle of the River Raisin during the War of 1812.
  16. Estill County 50th county, established in 1808, named in honor of Captain James Estill who was killed by Indians during Estill's Defeat on 22 March 1782.
  17. Fayette County One of the three original counties, established by Virginia in 1780, named in honor of General Lafayette of France, who served in the American Revolution.
  18. Fleming County 26th county, established in 1798, named in honor of Colonel John Fleming, an early settler who built one of three forts in the county in 1790.
  19. Floyd County 40th county, established in 1799, named in honor of Colonel John Floyd, surveyor and pioneer explorer.
  20. Garrard County 25th county, established in 1796, named in honor of Colonel James Garrard, Revolutionary War veteran. Governor of Kentucky
  21. Grant County 67th county, established in 1820, named in honor of either Samuel Grant, a frontiersman killed fighting Indians, and/or his brothers, Colonel John Grantand Squire Grant.
  22. Graves County 75th county, established in 1824, named in honor of Major Benjamin F. Graves, a Fayette County soldier killed at the Battle of River Raisin in the War of 1812.
  23. Grayson County 54th county, established in 1810, named in honor of Colonel William Grayson, an aide to General Washington during the American Revolution.
  24. Green County 16th county, established in 1792, named in honor of General Nathanael Greene, a hero of the Revolutionary War. Known as the "Quaker general," Greene was an American commander at Boston, Long Island, Trenton, Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, and several other engagements. In 1780 he was appointed commander of the southern theater of operations; he and his troops forced the British out of the Carolinas and toward surrender at Yorktown in 1781.
  25. Greenup County 45th county, established in 1803, named in honor of Christopher Greenup, Revolutionary War officer. 4th Governor of Kentucky.
  26. Hardin County 15th county, established in 1792, named in honor of Colonel John Hardin of Nelson County.
  27. Harlan County 60th county, established in 1819, named in honor of Silas Harlan, a hero of the Battle of Blue Licks.
  28. Harrison County 17th county, established in 1793, named in honor of Colonel Benjamin Harrison of Pennsylvania, who settled in Bourbon County, and wrote part of the constitution of Kentucky.
  29. Hart County 61st county, established in 1819, named in honor of Captain Nathaniel G. T. Hart, who was captured and killed by Indians at the Battle of River Raisin.
  30. Henderson County 38th county, established in 1798, named in honor of Colonel Richard Henderson, founder of the Transylvania Company.
  31. Hickman County 71st county, established in 1821, named in honor of Captain Paschal Hickman, killed in the massacre at the River Raisin in 1813.
  32. Hopkins County 49th county, established in 1806, named in honor of General Samuel Hopkins, a Revolutionary War veteran.
  33. Jackson County 105th county, established in 1858, named in honor of General Andrew Jackson, veteran of the War of 1812 and President of the United States.
  34. Johnson County 97th county, established in 1843, named in honor of Colonel Richard M. Johnson, veteran of the War of 1812 and Vice President of the United States.
  35. Kenton County 90th county, established in 1840, named in honor of Simon Kenton.
  36. Knox County 41st county, established in 1799, named in honor of General Henry Knox of Massachusetts, Revolutionary War hero and the nation's first secretary of war.
  37. Larue County 98th county, established in 1843, named in honor of John Larue, a veteran of the Revolutionary War.
  38. Lawrence County 96th county, established in 1821, named in honor of Captain James Lawrence, commander of the USS Chesapeake during the War of 1812.
  39. Lewis County 48th county, established in 1806, named in honor of Captain Merriweather Lewis.
  40. Lincoln County One of the three original counties established by Virginia in 1790, named in honor of General Benjamin Lincoln, a military commander during the Revolutionary War. General Lincoln was a British prisoner of war at the time the county was formed.
  41. Logan County 13th county, established in 1792, named in honor of General Benjamin Logan, a Virginian who came to the Kentucky frontier in 1774 and participated in several campaigns against the Indians.
  42. McCracken County 78th county, established in 1825, named in honor of Captain Virgil McCracken, killed at the Battle of the River Raisin, 22 January 1813.
  43. McCreary County 120th county, established in 1912, named in honor of Confederate Lieutenant Colonel James Bennett McCreary. 27th and 37th Governor of Kentucky.
  44. McLean County 103rd county, established in 1854, named in honor of Alney McLean, veteran of the War of 1812.
  45. Madison County - President James Madison, War of 1812.
  46. Marion County 84th county, established in 1834, named in honor of General Francis Marion, the "Swamp Fox" of the Revolutionary War who won fame for his military tactics against the British in the southern theater of operations.
  47. Martin County 116th county, established in 1870, named in honor of Colonel John P. Martin, called the "Rob Roy" of Kentucky.
  48. Meade County 76th county, established in 1823, named in honor of Captain James Meade of Woodford County, who fought at the Battle of Tippecanoe and was killed at the Battle of River Raisin in 1813.
  49. Mercer County 6th county, established in 1785, named in honor of General Hugh Mercer, a Scotsman who was killed at the Battle of Princeton in the Revolutionary War.
  50. Metcalf County 106th county, established in 1860, named in honor of Thomas Metcalf, who served in the Corn Stalk Militia and a veteran of the War of 1812. 10th Governor of Kentucky.
  51. Montgomery County 22nd county, established in 1796, named in honor of General Richard Montgomery, who was killed at the Revolutionary War battle of Quebec.
  52. Morgan County 73rd county, established in 1822, named in honor of General Daniel Morgan, a veteran of the Revolutionary War.
  53. Muhlenburg County 34th county, established in 1798, named in honor of General John Peter Muhlenburg, a hero of the Revolutionary War and Congressman from Pennsylvania.
  54. Nicholas County 42nd county, established in 1799, named in honor of Colonel George Nicholas of Fayette County, a Revolutionary War veteran.
  55. Oldham County 74th county, established in 1823, named in honor of Colonel William Oldham of Jefferson County, a Revolutionary War Officer and a native of Virginia. Oldham was killed in 1794 while leading a regiment of Kentucky Militia against the Indians during the St. Clair campaign on the Wabash River.
  56. Owen County 63rd county, established in 1819, named in honor of Colonel Abraham Owen, Indian fighter and Kentucky legislator, who was killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
  57. Owsley County 96th county, established in 1843, named in honor of William Owsley, served in the Cornstalk Militia. 16th Governor of Kentucky.
  58. Perry County 68th county, established in 1820, named in honor of Oliver Hazard Perry, hero of the War of 1812.
  59. Pike County 70th county, established in 1821, named in honor of General Zebulon Pike, U.S. Army officer and explorer who discovered Pike's Peak.
  60. Pulaski County 27th county, established in 1798, named in honor of Casimir Pulaski, famous Polish-American patriot, killed at Savannah in 1779 during the American Revolutionary War.
  61. Russell County 81st county, established in 1825, named in honor of Colonel William Russell, a Revolutionary War officer who fought at the Battle of Kings Mountain.
  62. Scott County 11th county, established in 1792, named in honor of General Charles Scott, a veteran of the French and Indian Wars, Revolutionary War and the Indian campaigns. 4th Governor of Kentucky.
  63. Shelby County 12th county, established in 1792, named in honor of General Isaac Shelby, veteran of Lord Dunmore's War, Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. Kentucky's first Governor.
  64. Simpson County 62nd county, established in 1819, named in honor of Captain John Simpson, killed at the Battle of River Raisin during the War of 1812.
  65. Spencer County 77th county, established in 1824, named in honor of Captain Spears Spencer, a member of the Corn Stalk Militia. Spencer formed the Yellow Jackets rifle company in 1809 and joined General William Henry Harrison's command in the Tippecanoe campaign, where he was killed on 7 November 1811.
  66. Taylor County 100th county, established in 1848, named in honor of General Zachary Taylor, hero of the Mexican War and 12th President of the United States.
  67. Todd County 64th county, established in 1819, named in honor of Colonel John Todd, who was killed at the Battle of Blue Licks, 19 August 1782.
    Trigg County 66th county, established in 1820, named in honor of Colonel Stephen Trigg, a native of Virginia, who was fatally wounded at the Battle of Blue Licks.
  68. Warren County 24th county, established in 1796, named in honor of General Joseph Warren, who dispatched William Dawes and Paul Revere on their midnight ride to warn the countryside of the British approach and who was a hero of the Battle of Bunker Hill during the Revolutionary War.
  69. Washington County 10th county, established in 1792, named in honor of General George Washington, hero of the American Revolution and First President of the United States.
  70. Wayne County 43rd county, established in 1800, named in honor of General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, a veteran of the Revolutionary War and Indian campaigns.
  71. Whitley County 59th county, established in 1818, named in honor of Colonel William Whitley, a Kentucky pioneer and Indian fighter.
  72. Woodford County 9th county, established in 1788, named in honor of General William Woodford, a Virginia officer in the Revolutionary War, who died a prisoner of war of the British.
Kentucky Counties Named in Honor of Heroes of the War of 1812

Thirty of Kentucky’s one-hundred-twenty counties, twenty-five percent, are named after individuals who earned their reputations during the War of 1812 in the old northwest - including the Battle of Tippecanoe.

 

Last Updated 6/12/2008
Privacy | Security | Disclaimer | Accessibility Statement