1950s

In Chronological Order of Award

PV2 HENRY FORD MOORE
Battery A
138th Field Artillery Battalion
Kentucky Army National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

2 August 1953
Private E-2 Henry Ford Moore, did, at 1055 hours on the second day of August 1953, while swimming in the Ohio River Chute off Towhead Island, and without regard for his own personal safety and at the risk of his life, save the life of a companion with whom he was swimming, BILLY CHASTEEN, of 122 North Clay Street, Louisville, Kentucky. Billy became ill and yelled for help and Private Moore swam to his rescue, Billy clutched him frantically nearly causing both to loose their lives in the ensuing struggle. Private Moore, broke his friend's grip after wrestling briefly in the water. Billy immediately slipped under, and Private Moore surface dived six feet under water, lifted Billy to the surface and dragged him to the island shore. There he administered artificial respiration until rescued by the Cruiser KISMET. Artificial respiration was continued aboard the cruiser until they arrived at the Louisville Coast Guard Station where Billy was finally revived by the Coast Guard. The heroism displayed by Private Moore on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself, The Kentucky National Guard and the Military Service.

T/SGT CHARLES WILLIAM SIMMONS
Headquarters
123rd Fighter Bomber Wing
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

28 September 1953
On 28 September 1953, at Standiford Field, Louisville, Kentucky, T/SGT Charles W. Simmons (then in a civilian Air Technician capacity as a member of the Alert Crew of the 123rd Fighter Bomber Wing, Kentucky Air National Guard) distinguished himself as follows: At 1617 hours, this date, a civilian resort airline aircraft chartered to the Army, carrying a total of forty-one (41) soldiers and crewmen, most of whom were returning Korean veterans, crashed while landing. There is no fire fighting or crash rescue facilities at Standiford Field and T/SGT Simmons immediately manned the "155" fire fighting truck of the Air National Guard and rushed to the scene of the crash. The aircraft was burning severely when T/SGT Simmons arrived and despite the imminent possibility of gasoline tank explosion, T/SGT Simmons, without benefit of protective clothing, climbed on the burning wing of the aircraft and subdued the blazing wing and fuselage. Such heroic action undoubtedly saved the lives of at least ten severely injured soldiers who were unable to help themselves. Such actions reflect great credit on T/SGT Simmons, The Air National Guard, and the United States Air Force.

THREE WIN SOLDIERS MEDALS: Recognized for their gallantry in rescuing Puerto Rican soldiers from a civilian air crash at Standiford Field were (from left): MSgt Howard Curtis, TSgt Walter Carter, TSgt Charlie Simmons, and AIC Jessie Brown. Page 119 Mustangs to Phantoms. 

FOUR SOLDIERS MEDALS: Recognized for their gallantry in rescuing Puerto Rican soldiers from a civilian air crash at Standiford Field were (from left): MSgt Howard Curtis, TSgt Walter Carter, TSgt Charlie Simmons, and AIC Jessie Brown. Page 119 Mustangs to Phantoms.

T/SGT HOWARD ARTHUR CURTIS
Headquarters
123rd Fighter Bomber Wing
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

28 September 1953
On 28 September 1953, at Standiford Field, Louisville, Kentucky, T/SGT Howard A. Curtis (then in a civilian Air Technician capacity as a member of the Alert Crew of the 123rd Fighter Bomber Wing, Kentucky Air National Guard) distinguished himself as follows: At 1617 hours, this date, a civilian resort airline aircraft chartered to the Army, carrying a total of forty-one (41) soldiers and crewmen, most of whom were returning Korean veterans, crashed while landing. T/SGT Curtis immediately manned the Air National Guard crash ambulance and rushed to the scene of the crash. The aircraft was burning severely upon his arrival, but despite the imminent possibility of explosion, T/SGT Curtis, without benefit of protective clothing, proceeded to assist in the rescue of injured and dying passengers. His quick action and disregard for personal safety were responsible for the saving of many lives. T/SGT Curtis' courage, initiative and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself, The Air National Guard, and t he United States Air Force.

T/SGT WALTER CARTER
Headquarters
123rd Fighter Bomber Wing
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

28 September 1953
On 28 September 1953, at Standiford Field, Louisville, Kentucky, T/SGT Walter Carter (then in a civilian Air Technician capacity as a member of the Alert Crew of the 123rd Fighter Bomber Wing, Kentucky Air National Guard) distinguished himself as follows: At 1617 hours, this date, a civilian resort airline aircraft chartered to the Army, carrying a total of forty-one (41) soldiers and crewmen, most of whom were returning Korean veterans, crashed while landing. There is no fire fighting or crash rescue facilities at Standiford Field and T/SGT Carter immediately manned the "155" fire fighting truck of the Air National Guard and rushed to the scene of the crash. The aircraft was burning severely when T/SGT Carter arrived and despite the imminent possibility of gasoline tank explosion, T/SGT Carter, without benefit of protective clothing, climbed on the burning wing of the aircraft and subdued the blazing wing and fuselage. Such heroic action undoubtedly saved the lives of at least ten severely injured soldiers who were unable to help themselves. Such actions reflect great credit on T/SGT Carter, The Air National Guard, and the United States Air Force.

A/1C JESSE DANIELSON BROWN, JR.
Headquarters
123rd Fighter Bomber Wing
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

28 September 1953
On 28 September 1953, at Standiford Field, Louisville, Kentucky, A/1C Jesse D. Brown, Jr. (then in a civilian Air Technician capacity as a member of the Alert Crew of the 123rd Fighter Bomber Wing, Kentucky Air National Guard) distinguished himself as follows: At 1617 hours, this date, a civilian resort airline aircraft chartered to the Army, carrying a total of forty-one (41) soldiers and crewmen, most of whom were returning Korean veterans, crashed while landing. There is no fire fighting or crash rescue facilities at Standiford Field and A/1C Brown immediately manned the "155" fire fighting truck of the Air National Guard and rushed to the scene of the crash. The aircraft was burning severely when Airman Brown arrived and despite the imminent possibility of gasoline tank explosion, Airman Brown, without benefit of protective clothing, climbed on the burning wing of the aircraft and subdued the blazing wing and fuselage. Such heroic action undoubtedly saved the lives of at least ten severely injured soldiers who were unable to help themselves. Such actions reflect great credit on A/1C Brown, The Air National Guard, and the United States Air Force.

PV2 KERMIT W. DEAL
Battery B
640th Field Artillery Battalion
Kentucky Army National Guard
Ashland, Kentucky

01 February 1957
On 1 February 1957, Private Kermit W. Deal, on State Active Duty for the purpose of aiding in the preservation of life and property during the devastating floods in Eastern Kentucky, distinguished himself as follows: At 0400 hours, Private Deal, without thought to his own safety, entered a severely burning building and carried a resident from the building. Private Deal then wrapped the severely burned resident in a blanket to subdue the flames which were burning the clothing. Although the resident later died, such heroic action on the part of Private Deal brings great credit on himself, the Kentucky National Guard, and the armed forces as a whole.