1970s

In Chronological Order

SSG JOHN E. MOORE
Headquarters and Headquarters Company
1st Battalion, 123rd Armor
Kentucky Army National Guard
Paducah, Kentucky

10 June 1972
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty

SP4 GLEN R. FARMER
Headquarters and Headquarters Company
1st Battalion, 123rd Armor
Kentucky Army National Guard
Paducah, Kentucky

10 June 1972
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty

Wren Walters receiving the Kentucky Medal for Valor from Governor Ford

CW2 WREN H. WALTERS
413th Heavy Equipment Maintenance Company
Kentucky Army National Guard
Frankfort, Kentucky

04 January 1973
For a deed of personal bravery above and beyond the call of duty on 4 January 1973.

NOTE: The actual citation for the KY Medal for Valor was not available. This account was pieced together from witness accounts and publications. Thanks for information and research assistance to: CW4 (R) Harold Canon; LTC (R) Willoughby S. Goin III; Glenn Minor; SFC (R) Thomas J Murphy III; CSM (R) Frederick D, Schleifer; COL (R) Ralph Palmore and CW4 (R) Murray Parrish.  

Members of a 413th Heavy Equipment Maintenance Company we were traveling in a convoy to Fort Knox and as the convoy. As the convoy passed over the Salt River bridge on Highway 31 W at West Point, a woman was observed walking along the highway and onto the bridge. She proceeded to climb over the railing apparently intending to jump to her death in the frigid river below. Walters stopped his vehicle as he crossed the bridge and restrained the woman, risking possible injury or being dragged into the river himself until other Guardsmen got to the site and assisted in pulling her back over the railing to safety.
Walters was presented the medal By Governor Wendell H. Ford and Maj Gen Richard L. Frymire during a ceremony at Annual Training in June of 1974 at Fort Knox.

SP4 MICHAEL J. DARBY
Headquarters and Headquarters Battery
2nd Battalion, 138th Field Artillery
Kentucky Army National Guard
Lexington, Kentucky

20 October 1974
For extraordinary heroism and courageous action, which resulted in the saving of another's life.

CPT ARCHIE T. STONE
441st Medical Detachment
(Helicopter Ambulance)
Kentucky Army National Guard
Frankfort, Kentucky

23 August 1975
Displayed conspicuous acts of courage, gallantry, and valor.

CW2 RAYMOND E. GARRISON JR.
441st Medical Detachment
(Helicopter Ambulance)
Kentucky Army National Guard
Frankfort, Kentucky

23 August 1975
Displayed conspicuous acts of courage, gallantry, and valor.

SGT Wall (at right) runs to retrieve a smoke grenade from the Churchill Downs track after the 102nd KY Derby had begun. Assisting were SGT John Yeager and PFC Steven Stacy all of the 438th MP CO. 

SGT Wall (at right) runs to retrieve a smoke grenade from the Churchill Downs track after the 102nd KY Derby had begun. Assisting were SGT John Yeager and PFC Steven Stacy all of the 438th MP CO.

SGT GARY D. WALL
438th Military Police Company
Kentucky Army National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

01 May 1976
Sergeant Gary D. Wall, 438th Military Police Company, Kentucky National Guard, distinguished himself by a conspicuous act of bravery above and beyond the call of duty while serving on State Active Duty during the running of the 102nd Kentucky Derby. While serving in the Governor's escort, Sergeant Wall saw an ignited smoke grenade thrown onto the track immediately after the Derby had commenced. The potential for disaster was immediate and incalculable. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Wall ran onto the track to retrieve the burning grenade. Though temporarily blinded by the smoke and unable to determine the location of the horses, he carried the grenade to the edge of the track where it was buried. Sergeant Wall's immediate reaction to the situation prevented the 102nd Kentucky Derby from becoming a total disaster and without doubt saved the lives of jockeys, horses, and spectators. His heroic action prevented a catastrophic conclusion to one of the most exciting sports events in the world. This singularly distinctive act is in the highest traditions of the Kentucky Army National Guard and reflects great credit upon himself and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

SGT ALAN C. BUNTING
123rd Combat Support Group
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

08 February 1977
Sergeant Alan C. Bunting distinguished himself by an act of exceptional heroism and a total lack of concern for his personal safety on the evening of 8 February 1977. In the apartment building in which he resides, a fire broke out in a nearby apartment occupied by a young women. Sensing the heat and smoke, Sergeant Bunting immediately became aware that there may be others who either did not sense the danger or who may have already suffered from the heat and smoke inhalation. He searched the complex, found the unconscious young women and carried her to safety and medical aid. The selfless act of concern of Sergeant Bunting reflects great credit upon himself and the Kentucky Air National Guard.

SSG JERRY MICHAEL PERKINS
123rd CAM Squadron
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

17 April 1977
On 17 April 1977, SSG Michael O. Harp and SSG Jerry M. Perkins were off-duty from the Kentucky Air National Guard and at Bowman Field, Louisville, Kentucky. At or about 1355 hours, a small single engine aircraft was in the process of taking off, and during which time encountered difficulty at an altitude of approximately 40 feet resulting in its crashing. Upon hearing and observing the crash, Staff Sergeants Harp and Perkins immediately ran to the downed aircraft and attempted to remove the pilot and the one other passenger. The pilot was extricated without difficulty but the passenger was discovered to be pinned between the crushed nose of the aircraft and the seat back. The load in the back seats having shifted forward coupled with fuel leaking from the aircraft's full fuel tanks created a situation which placed the passenger and his rescuers in extreme personal danger. Recognizing the immediate threat to the passenger's life and without regard to their own personal safety, Staff Sergeants Harp and Perkins managed to eventually move the shifted load, releasing the seat back and work the passenger free. They then carried the man from the fuel-soaked aircraft wreckage to safety. Minutes later, emergency fire and medical help arrived and Staff Sergeants Harp and Perkins left the scene. By the conspicuous acts of courage, gallantry, and valor above and beyond the call of duty, SSG Michael O. Harp and SSG Jerry M. Perkins have honored themselves and the Kentucky Air National Guard.

SSG MICHAEL O'DELL HARP
123rd CAM Squadron
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

17 April 1977
On 17 April 1977, SSG Michael O. Harp and SSG Jerry M. Perkins were off-duty from the Kentucky Air National Guard and at Bowman Field, Louisville, Kentucky. At or about 1355 hours, a small single engine aircraft was in the process of taking off, and during which time encountered difficulty at an altitude of approximately 40 feet resulting in its crashing. Upon hearing and observing the crash, Staff Sergeants Harp and Perkins immediately ran to the downed aircraft and attempted to remove the pilot and the one other passenger. The pilot was extricated without difficulty but the passenger was discovered to be pinned between the crushed nose of the aircraft and the seat back. The load in the back seats having shifted forward coupled with fuel leaking from the aircraft's full fuel tanks created a situation which placed the passenger and his rescuers in extreme personal danger. Recognizing the immediate threat to the passenger's life and without regard to their own personal safety, Staff Sergeants Harp and Perkins managed to eventually move the shifted load, releasing the seat back and work the passenger free. They then carried the man from the fuel-soaked aircraft wreckage to safety. Minutes later, emergency fire and medical help arrived and Staff Sergeants Harp and Perkins left the scene. By the conspicuous acts of courage, gallantry, and valor above and beyond the call of duty, SSG Michael O. Harp and SSG Jerry M. Perkins have honored themselves and the Kentucky Air National Guard.

Adjutant General Frymire with Ross, at left, and Cross, at right, after awarding them the Kentucky Medal for Valor 

Adjutant General Frymire with Ross, at left, and Cross, at right, after awarding them the Kentucky Medal for Valor

SSG HUGH CYRUS ROSS
470th Medical Detachment
(Helicopter Ambulance)
Kentucky Army National Guard
Frankfort, Kentucky

15 August 1977
SSG Hugh C. Ross distinguished himself by an act of courage and gallantry above and beyond the ordinary call of duty. On the morning of 5 April 1977, SSG Ross and the crew of a UH-1 medical evacuation helicopter were sent to Pineville, Kentucky to aid flood victims in that area. Shortly after arriving they were informed of three ladies, ranging in age from 68-83, stranded on a church roof. Other attempts to rescue these people by boat had failed because of swift waters and high voltage power lines. The helicopter was maneuvered, in high winds and deteriorating weather, over the church where a crew chief was lowered by hoist 60 to 70 feet to the church roof. The ladies were then raised to the aircraft one by one. Because of low fuel and a heavy load the crew chief was forced to remain on the roof until the ladies were taken to the hospital and the aircraft refueled. Later that day an elderly man was rescued using this same technique. This was done during periods of low ceilings and treacherous winds with no regard for personnel safety. The combined efforts of this highly skilled crew was responsible for saving the lives of these people. This heroic act reflect great credit upon themselves and the Kentucky Army National Guard.

Adjutant General Frymire with Ross, at left, and Cross, at right, after awarding them the Kentucky Medal for Valor 

Adjutant General Frymire with Ross, at left, and Cross, at right, after awarding them the Kentucky Medal for Valor

SP5 HARMON D. CROSS
201st Engineer Battalion
Kentucky Army National Guard
Ashland, Kentucky

Click Here To See Image of Citation

15 August 1977
SP5 Harmon Dale Cross distinguished himself by an act of courage and gallantry; above and beyond the ordinary call of duty. On the morning of 5 Apr 77 SP5 Cross and the crew of a UH-l medical evacuation helicopter were sent to Pineville, KY to aid flood victims in that area. Shortly after arriving they were informed of three ladies, ranging in age from 68-83, stranded on a church roof. Other attempts to rescue these people by boat had failed because of swift waters and high voltage power lines. The aircraft was maneuvered, in high winds and deteriorating weather, over the church where he was lowered by hoist 60-70 feet to the church roof. The ladies were then raised to the aircraft one by one. Because of low fuel and a heavy load he was forced to remain stranded on the roof until the ladies were taken to the hospital and the aircraft refueled. Later that day an elderly man was rescued using this same technique. This was done during periods of low ceilings and treacherous winds with no regard for personal safety. The combined effort of this highly skilled crew was responsible for saving the lives of these people. This heroic act reflects great credit upon themselves and the Kentucky Army National Guard.

MSG Harmon D. Cross is the only known individual to receive the Kentucky Medal for Valor twice. The first event was during April 1977 and the second in January 1978. The first award was presented in the fall of 1977. His second award for events transpiring in January 1978 was not presented until December 2007. You can view his second citation by clicking here: Recipients 2000s

From left to right SGT Harmon Cross, SGT John Larka and SSG Hugh Ross receive the Kentucky Medal for Valor from MG Frymire, the Adjutant General. At right is State Command Sergeant Major Marion Williams. 

From left to right SGT Harmon Cross, SGT John Larka and SSG Hugh Ross receive the Kentucky Medal for Valor from MG Frymire, the Adjutant General. At right is State Command Sergeant Major Marion Williams.

SGT JOHN R. LARKA
From left to right SGT Harmon Cross, SGT John Larka and SSG Hugh Ross receive the Kentucky Medal for Valor from MG Frymire, the Adjutant General. At right is State Command Sergeant Major Marion Williams.Headquarters and Headquarters Company
1st Battalion, 123rd Armor
Kentucky Army National Guard
Paducah, Kentucky

26 September 1977
Sergeant John R. Larka displayed outstanding courage and heroism on 15 July 1977 while swimming at the North Fort Hood, Texas swimming pool during his off-duty time. At approximately 1500 hours on that date, Sergeant Larka heard someone yell, "help, he is drowning." At the time Sergeant Larka noticed a small Guardsman attempting to pull another Guardsman from the water with no success. Sergeant Larka noticed that the individual had gone down in ten feet of water and was lying on the bottom of the pool. Sergeant Larka, with complete disregard for his personal safety, dove to the bottom of the pool where he pulled the lifeless victim to the surface and to the edge of the pool. At that time, the lifeguard on duty assisted Sergeant Larka in removing the individual from the pool and began to administer first aid to revive the victim. Sergeant Larka's quick thinking and immediate action with disregard for his personal safety, saved the life of his fellow Guardsman. Sergeant Larka's courage and heroism above and beyond the call of duty reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the Kentucky Army National Guard.

CAPT JACQUELYN D. REID
123rd Tactical Hospital
Standiford Field (ANG)
Kentucky Air National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

20 November 1977
On 20 November 1977 at approximately 1130 hours Captain Jacquelyn D. Reid was returning to Standiford Field (ANG), Louisville, Kentucky after having picked up T/SGT Melvin E. Bowles and SSGT David R. Heustis who had been at collection points supporting Louisville's, Save Our Sports Campaign. Upon parking her car in the general area of the Kentucky Air National Guard Club, which parallels Grade Lane and I-65, she heard screeching of tires and almost simultaneously a crash. A 28 year old lady, and her 6 year old daughter attempted to avoid hitting a dog on I-65. In doing so, the lady lost control of her vehicle on the rain-slick highway; her car spun around and was struck by a semi-trailer truck. The truck smashed into the unidentified lady's car pinning her in the car. Both of her legs and both arms were broken. Captain Reid immediately ran toward the scene of the accident, climbed a security chain-linked fence, including the 45 degree barbed-wire deterrent on top, waded through a six-foot wide ditch of water between Old Grade Land and I-65 and got to the scene. She discovered that the lady had no pulse and was not breathing. She cleared the lady's throat, establishing an airway and enabled her to breathe. She stayed with her until the emergency vehicle arrived and took her to the hospital where she was pronounced dead on arrival. Captain Reid, a registered nurse, clearly performed duty above and beyond the call of duty so as to distinguish this aggressive selfless act as one of courage and valor above and beyond the call of duty. She is richly deserving of this award for her solid rational approach to an emergency situation.

SSG KEITH W. NORMAN
Headquarters and Headquarters Battery
1st Battalion, 623rd Field Artillery
Kentucky Army National Guard
Glasgow, Kentucky

16 May 1978
Meritorious service to the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the Kentucky Army National Guard for outstanding efforts in the saving of a human life.

SP5 WAYNE E. OWENS
Headquarters and Headquarters Battery
2nd Battalion 138th Field Artillery
Kentucky Army National Guard
Lexington, Kentucky

16 May 1978
Specialist Fifth Class Wayne E. Owens distinguished himself by an exceptionally valorous act above and beyond the ordinary call of duty on 15 October 1977 while serving as jumpmaster at the Central Kentucky Sport Parachute Club, Madison County, Kentucky. While Specialist Owens was serving in this capacity as jumpmaster on a Cessna 182 at 3000 feet with three student parachutists on board, the first jump student slipped from the jump step. Causing his canopy to become entangled with the wheel and step of the aircraft, towing his below the plane, and causing the aircraft to rapidly lose altitude. Fearing that the student was about to panic, and may not activate his emergency parachute if cut free, and realizing that the aircraft would crash in a few moments without drastic action, Specialist Owens, without regard for his own personal safety, climbed out of the aircraft and down the canopy and suspension lines toward the student. He then deliberately wrapped his legs around the lines and canopy, and using h is legs and neck, succeeded in causing the canopy to break loose from the aircraft. Specialist Owens then opened his main parachute at 800 feet. The violent opening of his canopy caused the lines which were wrapped around him to rip from his legs, neck, and head, causing him several minor injuries. The student then opened his emergency parachute at 200 feet, landing safely. At inestimable personal risk to his own life, Specialist Owens took the only course of action which had any real possibility of success, and by doing so, assuredly saved one life and most probably three others. The superior initiative and courageous endeavor displayed by Specialist Owens reflect great credit upon himself and the Kentucky National Guard.

SGT JAMES R. RHODES
223rd Military Police Company
Kentucky Army National Guard
Louisville, Kentucky

8 September 1979
Meritorious service to the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the Kentucky Army National Guard during this period.